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International Journal Of Medical, Pharmacy And Drug Research(IJMPD)

Isolation of Natural Binding Agent from Barley Seeds and Its Characterization

Thakur Hitesh , Thakur Reena , Singla Shivali , Goyal Sachin


International Journal of Medical, Pharmacy and Drug Research(IJMPD), Vol-5,Issue-4, July - August 2021, Pages 9-15 , 10.22161/ijmpd.5.4.2

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Article Info: Received: 20 Jun 2021; Received in revised form: 10 Jul 2021; Accepted: 20 Jul 2021; Available online: 03 Aug 2021

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Development of new excipients is time consuming involves tedious procedures and highly expensive. Instead, identification of new uses for the existing substances is relatively and less time consuming. The intention of present study was designed for isolation and characterization of powder from the Hordeumvulgare seeds and explores its use as pharmaceutical binding agent. The barley powder was investigated for purity by carrying out chemical tests for different Phytochemicals constituents and Starch,Flavonoids, Phenol were found to be present. The powder was further characterized for physical and flow properties. Powder has good swelling index 12.7%, PH 6.9, Melting point 134, Moisture absorption 8%, Loss on drying 7.5%. The powder had good flow property as Carr’s Index 15.27, Angle of repose 29.35 and Hausnor’s ratio 1.15. From the study, it indicates that Hordeumvulgare seeds powder has satisfactory pH and physicochemical Properties, which can be used as pharmaceutical Binding agent in formulating various dosage form.

Barley; Binding agent; Flow Properties; Starch.

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